Science, Technology

BBC Horizon: The Hunt for AI ( Artificial Intelligence )

The oceans cover three-quarters of our planet, hiding a whole other world beneath the waves. If we could pull an imaginary plug at the bottom of the sea and, layer by layer, expose the majesty and mystery of what lies beneath, we would be astounded. (www.youtube.com)

1. Microorganisms (1674)
Microscope lens grinder Anton Van Leeuwenhoek accidentally discovers microorganisms in a drop of water. Using his own microscopes, he observes sperm, bacteria and red blood cells. His observations lay the foundation for the sciences of bacteriology and microbiology.
2. The Cell Nucleus (1831)
While studying an orchid, botanist Robert Brown identifies a structure within the cells that he terms the "nucleus."
3. Archaea (1977)

1. Oxygen (1770s)
Joseph Priestley discovers oxygen; later, Antoine Lavoisier clarifies the nature of elements. Priestley produces oxygen in experiments and describes its role in combustion and respiration. Then, by dissolving fixed air in water, he invents carbonated water. Priestley, oblivious to the importance of his discovery, calls the new gas "dephlogisticated air." Lavoisier gives oxygen its name and correctly describes its role in combustion. Lavoisier then works with others to devise a chemical nomenclature, which serves as the basis of the modern system.
2. Atomic Theory (1808)

A thousand years of observations reveal that there are stars that move in the sky and follow patterns, showing that the Earth is part of a solar system of planets separate from the fixed stars. (www.youtube.com)

Charles Darwin's theories radically changed the way we view the evolution of man; other top discoveries in evolution include the Burgess Shale fossils that provide a snapshot of ancient life andthe KT Asteroid which caused the demise of the dinosaurs. (www.youtube.com)

Discovery Channel documentary show about curious questions in science, technology, society etc. In each episode different question is being answered or is tried to be answered, featuring different celebrity host. (www.youtube.com)

Discovery Channel | Scientists have transformed the way we think and live throughout the centuries. What are the most important scientific discoveries of all time? In no particular order, we present the top 100 in eight different categories. (www.youtube.com)

Biology stands on the brink of a shift in the understanding of inheritance. The discovery of epigenetics -- hidden influences upon the genes -- could affect every aspect of our lives.

At the heart of this new field is a simple but contentious idea -- that genes have a 'memory'. That the lives of your grandparents -- the air they breathed, the food they ate, even the things they saw -- can directly affect you, decades later, despite your never experiencing these things yourself. And that what you do in your lifetime could in turn affect your grandchildren. (www.youtube.com)

There is a new kind of weather to worry about, and it comes from our nearest star.

Scientists are expecting a fit of violent activity on the sun which will propel billions of tonnes of superheated gas and pulses of energy towards our planet. They have the power to close down our modern technological civilisation - e.g. in 1989, a solar storm cut off the power to the Canadian city of Quebec.

Horizon meets the space weathermen who are trying to predict what is coming our way, and organistions like the National Grid, who are preparing for the impending solar storms. (www.youtube.com)

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