Nature

Broadcast (2007) With spectacular cinematography from land, sea and air, and blending rugged volcanic landscapes with intimate animal behaviour, this ambitious series from the BBC's Natural History Unit brings this remarkable archipelago to captivating life. This opening episode chronicles the many fascinating stages of the island chain's existence, and reveals how creatures have developed enterprising ways of dealing with life on this restless Pacific outpost.

A 16-year-long civil war that began in 1977 ravaged Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park, wiping out nearly 95 percent of the elephant population. Today, peace has been restored, but the surviving elephants still carry the emotional scars of war and must relearn how to trust humans. Follow a brother-and-sister team, Bob Poole and Dr. Joyce Poole, on a mission to help the traumatized elephants heal and to restore peace to a once-again-thriving wildlife sanctuary. (www.youtube.com)

Broadcast (1992) See how birds, bees, and even barnacles and naked mole rats are driven to reproduce and pass along their genes to the next generation. The Primal Instinct illustrates, sex lives comes in many varieties. Some animals mate for life, while others may spend just a few frenzied seconds with their partner. In some cases, the dad takes care of the kids, while in others the mom does all the work. And in many households, the newborns are left to fend for themselves, and will never meet their parents. (www.youtube.com)

Broadcast (2002) For the first time ever, scientists believe they have gathered substantial evidence that points to a single animal group of creatures that gave rise to all animals, including humans. Researchers such as Cristina Diaz and Mitch Sogin think that the most likely candidate for this "Animal Eve" is a group of creatures that still exist: the sponges. Sponges, members of the phylum Porifera, are considered the oldest living animal phylum. The name Porifera means "pore bearer" in Latin. Sponges are the only animals that if broken down to the level of their cells can miraculously reassemble themselves. These seemingly inanimate creatures are also fantastic pumps, filtering tons of water to harvest a few ounces of food. (www.youtube.com)

Broadcast (2006) In a stunning six-part miniseries narrated by stage and film actor Liev Schreiber, this Nature series presents a compelling new vision of the epic forces that have shaped every aspect of existence on our planet, in Triumph of Life. More than three years in the making, Triumph of Life combines dramatic storytelling with powerful, groundbreaking scientific ideas in a sweeping story about survival and the survivors - the winners, for the moment at least, in an eternal battle. (www.youtube.com)

Sea turtles have experienced global warming twice, and they are now returning to the Eastern shores of Canada, pushing into the North Atlantic as the oceans are warming...again. In Becoming Myth, while I tried mostly to focus on the wonder of marine turtles, I swiftly realized how hard they were to find. A ubiquitous symbol for this planet in N.America, Japan, China, India, & Indonesia, this isn't the kind of animal we want disappearing on us.
Written, shot, & edited, by David Arthur 2007-2011(www.youtube.com)

An underwater look at the diverse coastal regions of Southern Australia, New Guinea and the Indo-Pacific areas and the impact of global warming on the oceans. (www.youtube.com)

"The Superior human?" is the first documentary to systematically challenge the common human belief that humans are superior to other life forms. The documentary reveals the absurdity of this belief while exploding human bias. (www.youtube.com)

Broadcast (2002) When we think of animals, we think of movement. Surprisingly, the diverse and graceful ballet of animal movement may have started with cnidarians (pronounced "ny-DAIR-ee-ans), a group that includes corals, sea anemones, sea pens and jellyfish. All of these animals, with few exceptions, have nerves and muscles. Because cnidarians are the simplest animals to possess this complexity, their direct ancestors were very likely the first animals to bundle the power of nerves and muscles together, enabling them to move and exhibit discernible behavior. (www.youtube.com)

Broadcast (2002) Behind the beautiful shapes and colors of seashells is the story of how a group of animals called molluscs evolved in order to survive. The wide variety of molluscs includes clams, oysters, snails, mussels, squid, and octopus. The word mollusc comes from Latin meaning "soft," a good description of the group's fleshy bodies. Of course, in an ocean filled with predators, a soft body is easily eaten.

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