Lifestyle, Society

In his home of Namibia, John Kasaona is working on an innovative way to protect endangered animal species: giving nearby villagers (including former poachers) responsibility for caring for the animals. And it's working.

Small Fortunes: Microcredit and the Future of Poverty Millions of the worlds poorest mostly women who are unable to provide the necessary collateral to secure a traditional loan are turning to microcredit institutions for help. These institutions give micro loans, often for less than $100, to those for whom the entrepreneurial spirit is still in its purest, most basic form. Whether it's through milking a buffalo, selling tortillas, or weaving cloth, most borrowers are able to pay back their loans and have enough profits to reinvest in their businesses, their homes, and their children.

Excellent documentary on Jamaican music. Must see for roots, rock, reggae lovers :)

A very well built documentary about cannabis and drug prohibition. Does the drug prohibition work? Have a look and think for yourself.

"Well I think the roots of Icelandic music lies somewhere in viking age ... It's still alive with us because of the structure of the poetry ..."

1000 Years of Icelandic music documentary which sounds very good :)

his film is by far the most interesting presentation of Islam.
Through an examination of the Koran, other Islamic texts and the example of the prophet Muhammad, this movie argues, that violence against non-Muslims is and has always been an integral aspect of Islam.

An intimate glimpse into the life and world of one of Tibet's most revered teachers: Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche (1910-1991). A writer, poet and meditation master, Khyentse Rinpoche was an inspiration to all who encountered him. His many students throughout the world included the Dalai Lama. This unique portrait tells Khyentse Rinpoche's story from birth to death... -- from his escape following China's invasion of Tibet to his determination to preserve and transmit Buddhist teachings. Along with rare photographs of Tibet, Bhutan and Nepal, this film features interviews with the Dalai Lama.

Twelve hundred years ago the people of Tibet developed a comprehensive medical system. They understood how the mind affects the body. They knew subtle ways of changing the body's chemistry with medicines made from plants and minerals. They blessed their medicines in lengthy rituals. And they encoded this knowledge in a series of elaborate paintings called thangkas.

The Tibetan Book of the Dead: The Great Liberation This has the feel of those Mystic Fire videos, which may bother some of you. It is a companion piece to the Tibetan Book of the Dead, a Way of Life, which I liked better. The short film centers around the too early death of a 40 something young man, returned to his family from a long journey and stricken with an unknown illness. I think this might be an interesting introduction to the Tibetan Book of the Dead. Nice visuals of Ladakh. Was not impressed by the special effects, but the little boy/monk and the mentor monk have a good interaction.

Tibet: A Buddhist Trilogy takes you on an intimate journey deep into the heart of an ancient Buddhist world. Four years in the making and hailed as a cinematic masterpiece in 1979, writer/director Graham Coleman's three-part feature has been unseen for over 20 years. Now, the film has been reworked into a single presentation, complete with digital restoration of the original material and new commentary. Part 1 is an intimate portrait of the Dalai Lama as a spiritual and temporal leader.

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