History

A filmmaker makes a journey into her own family's history to investigate the terrible truth behind her grandmother's odd tattoos and, in the process, unveils the story of the Armenian women driven out of Ottoman Turkey during the First World War. (www.youtube.com)

Professor Jim Al-Khalili tells the electrifying story of our quest to master nature's most mysterious force - electricity. This series tells of dazzling leaps of imagination and extraordinary experiments - a story of maverick geniuses who used electricity to light our cities, to communicate across the seas and through the air, to create modern industry and to give us the digital revolution. (www.youtube.com)

James Cameron's epic 1997 film Titanic won 11 Oscars and grossed well over a billion dollars worldwide. Now, National Geographic Channel joins the director and explorer-in-residence for the ultimate forensic investigation into the most infamous shipwreck of all time in Titanic: The Final Word With James Cameron. Cameron, who has made more than 30 dives to explore the Titanic, brings together a team of engineers, naval architects, artists, and historians to solve the lingering mysteries of why and how an "unsinkable" ship sank.

A very interesting documentary revealing a hidden and truly enlightened side to one of the greatest minds that western civilisation has known. His deep study of science led him to a firm conclusion that there is a Creator and based on his study of early Christian history, he was convinced that the concept of The Trinity was a falsification of the pure message of monotheism that Jesus preached.

Famed for its wealth, cultural treasures, and spirituality, India has for centuries beckoned the outsider. Many have vied for control of this fabled and diverse land. Two great empires, one established by invading Moguls, the other by the British, flourished on this vast subcontinent. (www.youtube.com)

Broadcast (2003) Understanding of humans' earliest past often comes from studying fossils. They tell us much of what we know about the people who lived before us. There is one thing fossils cannot tell us; at what point did we stop living day-to-day and start to think symbolically, to represent ideas about our environment and how we could change it? At a dig in South Africa the discovery of a small piece of ochre pigment, 70,000 years old, has raised some very interesting questions. (www.youtube.com)

t the British Museum, a collection of artefacts from the Muslim world is on show which tells the history of a journey to Mecca always forbidden to non-Muslims. It features a succession of examples of the rich visual language of Islamic culture past and present, artwork created to reflect the powerful experience for any Muslim making the Hajj pilgrimage to Islam's most sacred city and its most sacred building, the Ka'aba.

Ocean-going vessels mysteriously missing their crews; ships long ago sunk damned to eternally sail the seas with the dead at the helm. Stories of ghost ships have been told by superstious sailors for centuries, but is there any truth to them? Modern science attempts to explain some of the more baffling cases like that of the Mary Celeste which was found without her crew and no signs of foul play. (www.youtube.com)

A documentary which is exploring the impact of racism on a global scale, as part of the season of programmes marking the 200th anniversary of the abolition of slave trade (but not slavery itself) in the British Empire. Beginning by assessing the implications of the relationship between Europe, Africa and the Americas in the 15th century, it considers how racist ideas and practices developed in key religious and secular institutions, and how they showed up in writings by European philosophers Aristotle and Immanuel Kant. (www.youtube.com)

Machu Picchu (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈmatʃu ˈpitʃu], Quechua: Machu Pikchu [ˈmɑtʃu ˈpixtʃu], "Old Peak") is a pre-Columbian 15th-century Inca site located 2,430 metres (7,970 ft) above sea level. Machu Picchu is located in the Cusco Region of Peru, South America. It is situated on a mountain ridge above the Urubamba Valley in Peru, which is 80 kilometres (50 mi) northwest of Cusco and through which the Urubamba River flows. Most archaeologists believe that Machu Picchu was built as an estate for the Inca emperor Pachacuti (1438–1472).

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