Moon

When Neil Armstrong first stepped into the Sea of Tranquility in 1969, the NASA program was in full swing. Nova explores the history of the organization from the creation of the National Aeronautics and Space Act a decade earlier to the famed walk on the moon. Alan Shepard became the first man in space with the launch of the Mercury project. From there, things moved swiftly as the Gemini project took off. Researching equipment and perfecting atmospheric entry was the program's main goal before the Apollo mission brought man to the lunar surface.

For two hours in July of 1969, the world stood still as man landed and walked on the moon. Tens of millions watched it happen, on blurry black and white television, beamed back a quarter million miles across the heavens. For the first time in human history, all mankind could observe a profound discovery as it happened.

The moon is such a familiar presence in the sky that most of us take it for granted. But what if it wasn't where it is now? How would that affect life on earth?

Space scientist and lunar fanatic Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock explores our intimate relationship with the moon. Besides orchestrating the tides, the moon dictates the length of a day, the rhythm of the seasons and the very stability of our planet.

National Geographic presents the first accurate non-stop voyage from Earth to the edge of the Universe using a single, unbroken shot through the use of spectacular CGI (Computer-Generated Imagery) technology. Building on images taken from the Hubble telescope, Journey to the Edge of the Universe explores the science and history behind the distant celestial bodies in the solar system.

Almost seven years later, on the first of July 2004, the Cassini probe entered the orbit of Saturn. It then began to compile what has become one of the greatest photographic collections of all time, of a giant gas planet, surrounded by colorful rings, guarded by a diverse collection of moons, and millions of tiny moonlets.

n the beginning, there was darkness, and then, bang—giving birth to an endless, expanding existence of time, space and matter. Now, see further than we've ever imagined, beyond the limits of our existence, in a place we call The Universe.

Some 900 million miles from the Sun in the outer regions of our Solar System orbiting the planet Saturnlies a mysterious world. Enceladus is enveloped in ice. Because nearly all of the sunlight that manages to hit its surface is reflected back into space, its one of the brightest objects in the solar system. It turns out that this distant outpost may harbor subsurface oceans and pre-conditions for life.

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