Generation

Life In A Day is a historic film capturing for future generations what it was like to be alive on the 24th of July, 2010.
Executive produced by Ridley Scott and directed by Kevin Macdonald. (www.youtube.com)

Broadcast (2005) The twenty-first century will be shaped by a revolution in biology that will enable us to read the genetic code of life as easily as we would read a book. We have gained the power to control the destiny of our species and the ability to manipulate and build humans at will. This fascinating new series will take us on an incredible journey into the future of being, and give a glimpse of things to come in the new age. (www.youtube.com)

Broadcast (2003) Where did we come from? Spencer Wells, a 33 year old population geneticist, has closed the door on his laboratory and is embarking on the biggest adventure of his life. His mission to retrace the most extraordinary journey of all time, a journey that involves every man, woman and child alive today. He offers his thoughts on this puzzling question, employing the latest in DNA research and technology to track the migration of humanity across the globe.

Broadcast (1989) Could a pterodactyl as large as a light aircraft have flown? Did millipedes once grow to six feet long? How did insects become preserved in amber for over 50 million years? All these questions and more are answered through the study of fossils. In his journeys to the most famous fossil sites in the world, David Attenborough discovers a pre-historic world teeming with life and full of enticing clues as to how life evolved. They reveal how dinosaurs hunted, lived in groups and cared for their young.

Broadcast (2002) When we think of animals, we think of movement. Surprisingly, the diverse and graceful ballet of animal movement may have started with cnidarians (pronounced "ny-DAIR-ee-ans), a group that includes corals, sea anemones, sea pens and jellyfish. All of these animals, with few exceptions, have nerves and muscles. Because cnidarians are the simplest animals to possess this complexity, their direct ancestors were very likely the first animals to bundle the power of nerves and muscles together, enabling them to move and exhibit discernible behavior. (www.youtube.com)

Broadcast (2002) Behind the beautiful shapes and colors of seashells is the story of how a group of animals called molluscs evolved in order to survive. The wide variety of molluscs includes clams, oysters, snails, mussels, squid, and octopus. The word mollusc comes from Latin meaning "soft," a good description of the group's fleshy bodies. Of course, in an ocean filled with predators, a soft body is easily eaten.

Broadcast (1998) Most of the dry land on Earth sits no more than a few hundred metres above sea level. But in some places mountain belts rise to heights of several kilometres.These regions are often prone to devastating earth tremors. How are mountains formed and what is the connection with earthquakes? The answer may lie in the fluid-like properties of the Earth's outer layers. According to a new theory, mountains may flow up or down when continents collide. In the process they affect the circulation of the planet's atmosphere and change the climate. (www.youtube.com)

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