Biology, Environment

The jaguar -- some call it the most mysterious and magnificent of all big cats. Ancient cultures considered them Gods for their power, beauty and speed. But little is really known about this species that stalks the deepest jungles. Researchers have collected information about male jaguars, but half of the picture is missing ... there's little know about females. For the first time, Boone Smith brings his expertise to Central and South America as he teams up with Dr. Howard Quigley, who leads Panthera's Jaguar Program.
National Geographic Wild (www.youtube.com)

Broadcast (2007) In a story blooming with beauty and scientific mystery, this program explores the incredible truth that lies behind the ravishing flowers we so love to behold: that humans could not have existed or evolved without them. "First Flower" probes the controversial discovery of Archaefructus, a Chinese fossil scientists believe is the earliest evidence of a flower yet found on Earth.

Broadcast (2005) The twenty-first century will be shaped by a revolution in biology that will enable us to read the genetic code of life as easily as we would read a book. We have gained the power to control the destiny of our species and the ability to manipulate and build humans at will. This fascinating new series will take us on an incredible journey into the future of being, and give a glimpse of things to come in the new age. (www.youtube.com)

As springtime dawns on the frozen landscape of Canada's high Arctic, Adam Ravetch sets off in search of one of the region's most massive and misunderstood animals - the walrus. Known as "The Walrus Man", Ravetch has devoted much of his career to documenting the lives of these tusked giants. Ravetch is on a mission to capture on film the drama when polar bears and walruses meet face-to-face. He also captures the unique and rarely seen behaviors of mother walruses and their newborn calves. At first glance, the eastern Canadian Arctic seems to be a place of frozen desolation.

Broadcast (2008) Most people imagine dinosaurs lurking in warm locales with swamps and jungles, dining on vegetation and each other. But "Arctic Dinosaurs" reveals that many species also thrived in the harsh environments of the north and south polar regions. NOVA follows two high-stakes expeditions and the paleontologists who push the limits of science to unearth 70 million-year-old fossils buried in the vast Alaskan tundra. (www.youtube.com)

Broadcast (2009) At age 78, E.O. Wilson is still going through his "little savage" phase of boyhood exploration of the natural world. In "Lord of the Ants," NOVA profiles this soft-spoken Southerner and Harvard professor, who is an acclaimed advocate for ants, biological diversity, and the controversial extension of Darwinian ideas to human society. (www.youtube.com)

Broadcast (2007) NATURE's two-part special DOGS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD tells the epic story of the wolf's evolution, how "man's best friend" changed human society and we in turn have radically transformed dogs. From the tiniest Chihuahua to the powerful and massive English Mastiff, modern domesticated dogs come in a bewildering array of shapes and sizes, with an equally diverse range of temperaments and behaviors. And yet, according to genetics, all dogs evolved from the savage and wild wolf-in a transformation that occurred just 15,000 years ago. (www.youtube.com)

Continental collision is a phenomenon of the plate tectonics of Earth that occurs at convergent boundaries. Continental collision is a variation on the fundamental process of subduction, whereby the subduction zone is destroyed, mountains produced, and two continents sutured together. Continental collision is known only from this planet and is an interesting example of how our different crusts, oceanic and continental, behave during subduction. (www.wikipedia.org)

Broadcast (2002) The best way to find food is to go out and hunt for it. But to hunt, you need to be able to move forward. And to move forward, you usually need a head with paired sense organs to know where you are going attached to a symmetrical body to get you there. Scientists believe that a flatworm like animal was the first creature to develop a head, brain, paired senses and a tail, the first to move forward and thus the first to hunt for food and mates. This breakthrough in bilateral design was enormous.

Broadcast (2002) As we go through our lives driving cars, exploring the Internet, studying the world around us it is hard to imagine that we're related to Earth's other animals. It's even a stretch to see what connects us with the rest of the chordates, a group of about 50,000 species including the vertebrates like fish, amphibians, reptiles and birds, mammals and ourselves. But indeed, all chordates, from the worm-like amphioxus to Homo sapiens have three common features.

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