Astronomy, Space

The moon is such a familiar presence in the sky that most of us take it for granted. But what if it wasn't where it is now? How would that affect life on earth?

Space scientist and lunar fanatic Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock explores our intimate relationship with the moon. Besides orchestrating the tides, the moon dictates the length of a day, the rhythm of the seasons and the very stability of our planet.

Broadcast (2002) For the first time ever, scientists believe they have gathered substantial evidence that points to a single animal group of creatures that gave rise to all animals, including humans. Researchers such as Cristina Diaz and Mitch Sogin think that the most likely candidate for this "Animal Eve" is a group of creatures that still exist: the sponges. Sponges, members of the phylum Porifera, are considered the oldest living animal phylum. The name Porifera means "pore bearer" in Latin.

Take a look at the science and mythic history of our relationship with the sun, with an eye for its lesser known and most recently uncovered secrets. (www.youtube.com)

A thousand years of observations reveal that there are stars that move in the sky and follow patterns, showing that the Earth is part of a solar system of planets separate from the fixed stars. (www.youtube.com)

If we are not alone, who or what else out there? Is anybody listening? Is physical travel from one star system to another possible?

Our technology is not sufficient to detect any intelligent life form beyond hundred-millions light years. There are over 125 billion galaxies and we may never catch any sign.

If there is a life, how will it develop? Will the mechanics of evolution be similar on the Earth?

Astronomers and scientists like Richard Dawkins explain their arguments on extraterrestrials. (www.youtube.com)

There is a new kind of weather to worry about, and it comes from our nearest star.

Scientists are expecting a fit of violent activity on the sun which will propel billions of tonnes of superheated gas and pulses of energy towards our planet. They have the power to close down our modern technological civilisation - e.g. in 1989, a solar storm cut off the power to the Canadian city of Quebec.

Horizon meets the space weathermen who are trying to predict what is coming our way, and organistions like the National Grid, who are preparing for the impending solar storms. (www.youtube.com)

National Geographic Death Of The Universe

Mankind has been fascinated with our red planetary neighbor since the dawn of time. Years after the scare caused by Orson Welles' War of the Worlds broadcast, we've dismissed the idea that Mars is inhabited by "little green men". Some imaginative Mars enthusiasts, however, point to the infamous "face" photograph as proof that an advanced race once prospered. Scientists do hold out hope that study of Martian meteorites and probes sent to the planet may uncover evidence of simpler life forms. (www.youtube.com)

Welcome to the 11th Dimension - The Elegant Universe - PBS NOVA

Part 3 of "The Elegant Universe" with host Brian Greene shows how Edward Witten of Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study, aided by others, revolutionized string theory by successfully uniting the five different versions into a single theory that is cryptically named "M-theory," a development that requires a total of eleven dimensions.

National Geographic presents the first accurate non-stop voyage from Earth to the edge of the Universe using a single, unbroken shot through the use of spectacular CGI (Computer-Generated Imagery) technology. Building on images taken from the Hubble telescope, Journey to the Edge of the Universe explores the science and history behind the distant celestial bodies in the solar system.

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